An artist working with electronics and electronic media, based in Brooklyn, NY

Posts tagged “digital

Glitch Textiles SALE on Fab.com

For the next 3 Days, Glitch Textiles are available on Fab.com with sales prices discounted over 20%!

“Electronic media artist Phillip Stearns translates technical malfunctions onto blankets. Available through his Brooklyn-based venture, Glitch Textiles, the cotton creations exhibit psychedelic patterns made by corrupting the hardware of a digital camera, resulting in imagery that’s beautiful in its flaws.” -Fab.com

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2012: A Year in Review

Year of the Glitch – Dither Animation Study No. 3

It’s 2013 and 2012 is history. Don’t know about the rest of you, but this last year was a rush. I’m not going to bore you with the details, but I will give a quick recap of the major projects and performances of the year.

But before we go down that rabbit hole, I thought I’d mention some things coming up In the immediate future: I’ll be performing at the newly reminted Silent Barn (Jan 11 in Brooklyn, NY) and also at Transmediale (Berlin). At Transmediale, I’ll also be working with Benjamin Gaulon on his DeFunct/ReFunct project with Karl Klomp, Gijs Gieskes, Tom Verbruggen, and Pete Edwards. Afterwards, I’ll be doing a residency at Alfred University working on the visuals for a collaboration with Aimee Norwich.

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Landscape (Abstract in Neon) installed at the NYC Industries for the Blind

Projects of 2012:

Year of the Glitch – A yearlong glitch-a-day project featuring the products of my formal and technical exploration of glitch art. 450+ posts and 42,000+ Followers

Glitch Textiles – Glitches in the cold, hard logic of digital circuits transformed into warm blankets, textiles, rugs, and more.

Moleskine Phase – Commissioned work for Moleskine Portraits event at Exit Art NY

Deluge – a sound and light installation that depicts the white noise of unoccupied radio frequencies as a showering rain of light. Exhibited at Transmittal (Free103Point9), Greene Country Council on the Arts, Catskill, NY.

Impact Study No. 1 – A neon light installation that visualizes environmental radioactivity. Exhibited at Lumen, COAHSI, Staten Island, NY

Listening to the Ocean on a Shore of Gypsum Sand – Algorithmically generated, 3D printed shells. Collaboration with Gene Kogan and Dan Tesene. Exhibited at Soundwalk 2012, Long Beach, CA.

Landscape (Abstract in Neon) – Exhibited at “The Sixth Sense and Other Myths” (Art Connects NY + Big Deal Arts), NYC Industries for the Blind, Borough Park, Brooklyn, NY.

Aura(l) Study No. 1 – A site-specific installation for InLight Richmond

Protochiptunes: Hyperarpeggiator – A project that uses simple digital logic microchips in surprisingly musical ways. Performances at 3rd Ward and Shea Stadium, Brooklyn, NY.

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Performing Fluorescene – image courtesy: Eastern Bloc MTL

Major Perfomances:

Interferences – IEA Residency (Alfred University – Alfred, NY), Investigate: No-Input Mixer Summit (Harvestworks and Issue Project Room – NY, NY)

Fluorescene – IEA Residency (Alfred University – Alfred, NY), Sight and Sound (Eastern Bloc – Montreal, QC, CA), Hack Queensday (STEIM – Amsterdam, Netherlands), On Site (Taiwan Artist Village – Taipei, Taiwan), Ende Tymes (Outpost – Ridgewood, NY).

Apeiron | Peras – Sight and Sound (Eastern Bloc – Montreal, QC, CA)

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Releases:

Macular Degeneration (Nadalex) – 5.1 Surround Sound composition created at Harvestworks in 2010.


ALL Glitch Textiles are on Sale!


I’m in the process of updating each and every page, but ALL Glitch Textiles are available on sale for $200 each plus $15 flat rate shipping (FedEx Ground). Just click on the design you like, then click the “Buy Now” button to place your order via PayPal.

Happy holidays!


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Sea of Pixels

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A remix of 012 after being converted from JPG to GIF and then subjected to progressive manipulation in Hex Fiend.


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From a prepared Kodak DC215 1 megapixel digital camera.


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From a prepared Kodak DC215 1 megapixel digital camera.


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From a prepared Kodak DC215 1 megapixel digital camera.


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From a prepared Kodak DC215 1 megapixel digital camera.


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Created using a prepared Canon Digital Rebel, manipulated in Hex Fiend, cropped in GIMP.


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Created from a source image generated using a prepared Olympus C-840L, converted into TIFF format, processed in Hex Fiend, cropped in GIMP.


Change Blindness


Without thinking about it, I had turned the TV on and settled on the couch. In an attempt to halt my exhausted mind, I was letting the stream of media wash over my brain, when a story about a recent fashion show featured an brief interview with designer, Gareth Pugh, set in motion a cascade of thoughts. He went on about opposites: black/white, male/female, good/evil—binary states. There was no grey area in the way he spoke about the elements he was working with in developing his fashion. My gut feeling is that this obsession with opposites and extremes, although cliche, is perhaps indicative of a general malaise.

Initially I was tempted to ask myself if extremism is merely a coincidence, concurrent with maturing global capitalism, or if it is a consequence of employing digital technologies in the advancement of free markets, but to make it an issue of economy casts the issue in the wrong light altogether. Digital technologies are symbols of speed, communication, efficiency, but also exemplify certain attitudes towards the material nature of reality—attitudes that express little about the spiritual content that define our connection to it.

Does building a culture upon a technological substrate that is based upon systems of discrimination, determinism and absolute binary states have subtle consequences for the formation and development of social behavior? Out of a sufficient number of bits (although each bit embodies an equal possibility of being in one of only two states) any quantity can be expressed in discrete terms. 32 bits is roughly 4.3 billion unique states, but does combinatorics have anything to say about the gray areas of our age? Ethics is replete with gradients; the events resulting from the meeting of cultures whose values and customs precipitate diverse ethics and morals, often times contradictory and incompatible, demand analysis which can reconcile extreme ideals and beliefs in a position between or outside them. Else, it could be reasoned to give both sides the means to eradicate the other.

Is it simply a matter of perspective? We can’t perceive the discrete nature of our digital age (perhaps this is why it slips by undetected), but it reflects a desire in our thinking for absolutism. Deterministic systems can easily be represented in deterministic machines, but what is the necessary fudge factor to introduce indeterminism into these same deterministic systems? Bigger numbers? Better math? Brute force computation? At what point does it matter?

For painting a digital gradient between incompatible color palettes, maybe it is a question of the limitation of our sense organs, but a simulation is a simulation and the world modeled after a complex system of mathematics lacks a certain spirit. Our ability to express becomes limited to the scope of our mathematical equations. Though we may be writing ourselves into the machines in the form of our programs, code, algorithms, the necessary reformulation of an indeterministic experience into discrete language to be executed on a deterministic machine robs its fruits of a certain vitality. Perhaps it’s a simple limitation of or present state of technological development that we have no mediated equivalent of a handshake, and sensual physical encounters are not yet possible over the so called broadband networks spanning the more developed parts of our globe. Perhaps a supplement should never be taken as a replacement for the real thing.

Objects are born from the mind and realized with the almost exclusive use of automated machines, or humans guided by routines optimized by machines. If we program the machine, does that necessarily imbue it with a spirit? What is there to be said about spiritless machines overdetermining the actions of spirited machines? Does this situation diminish or enrich the spirits of those machines who possess them? We are hard pressed to turn up well reasoned answers, and yet we’re removing the hand, which is attached to the spirit, from the making of our world. Curves formed from discrete values, guiding the indeterministic materials of the real world; the mind acting on matter, however mediated—we shape our world but to what extent? Where do our machines begin to exert their crude reduction of our intentions on our own thoughts as a form of deterministic human enabled machine agency? The relationship between human and machine is dynamic and reciprocal and we cannot easily formulate a way of quantifying it. It is difficult, if not impossible, to program that which we do not fully understand, let alone that which refuses to be subjected to discrete forms of classification and analysis.

Perhaps there is something that I fear and I can’t quite express it. There’s sense of a loss, but it’s not the loss itself that troubles me, it’s the general attitude towards that loss: indifference, ignorance, or complete obliviousness. And in the middle of this intuition is a sense of helplessness at the fact that nothing can be done to reverse the trend, only to create an isolated pocket of appreciative practitioners. Not Luddites, no. We will die without our technologies; they are outgrowths of our species and we share a common blood. But a world made by hand is quickly becoming the world made by the hand guided by the machine; its a pointless paranoia and the best I can do is make note of this uneasy feeling, reach for my pills and sleep it off.


Motion Blur Photographs

A new collection of long exposure digital photographs taken from moving vehicles.  This set, Bulb, was shot from a train heading into NYC.  Developing different sets of images from the DCP Series, has inspired me to re-create some of the effects of digital artifacts using different techniques, favoring the manipulation of light and exposure time rather than directly manipulating the circuitry of the digital imaging devices.  The next step in for this series will be to switch over to film or direct exposure of photographic paper.


Photogenesis

Meditations on chemical and digital photographic processes

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In non-digital photography—the “capture” of images through exposure—a moment in time is sublimated into a successive process of chemical mediations.  These translations are obscured in the resulting photographic image except to the skilled who can recognize certain chemical techniques for enhancement or manipulation. The deception of the photographic image lies in the obfuscation of technique—texture is an illusion resulting from light playing off surfaces or through objects.  In painting, the technique, because it always produces a certain texture, becomes integral to the perception of the work and its content.  Perhaps it is because painting must transcend or reconcile with its deception, and that it is not simply an image, that distinguishes it from photographic image making—the subject or referent is simulated through the illusion of light created through the application of paint on a surface, where in photography it is a photo-chemical impression upon physical material, a literal play of light upon surfaces.  The digital images from the DCP Series complicate this issue of texture and technique.  They exhibit a richness in detail, where the technique of manipulating the electronics of the camera asserts itself as simulated texture within the image, not in such a way as to reclaim that domain of texture occupied by painting but to draw attention to the fact that it—the digital image itself—is almost pure simulation, that there are many imperceptible layers of mediation involved in the production of the digital image which remove it from its referent.

DCP_Series - Modified Kodak DC280

DCP_Series - Modified Kodak DC280

The referent in the DCP Series images is the process of digital photography revealed through intervening with the physical hardware during image capture. Here the illusion of texture arises from the play of data through algorithms; light, and therefore exposure, is amputated from the digital photographic process.  Where the mediations separating the real from the simulated within non-digital photography involve photo-chemical transformations of materials via exposure and development, the mediations involved in the creation of the digital images in the DCP Series involve complicated algorithms which are made visible through the intervention of wires intersecting processes by connecting points on the circuit boards which were never intended to meet.  Though the specifics of the tools and methods involved in both practices are radically different, because digital photography evolved from non-digital photography, there exists not only an overlap but a discontinuity between the two.  By scrutinizing work produced at the limits of each practice, and attempting to locate the essence of one within the other, the possibility of creating new forms arises.

Locating the analog of the physical process of manipulating the circuits of digital cameras in the photographic process poses an interesting set of problems.  That the image of film based photography exists in a physical domain and the image of the digital era exists as a data set corresponding to the charges stored in vast arrays of microscopic capacitors already complicates any attempt to unite the domains of digital and photo-chemical image making.  The translation of light to a data set makes the digital camera an all in one image making machine; you don’t need to have a photo lab to produce images.  Data acquisition and storage; data read back and software interpretation of data; and output to the monitor replace the processes of exposing and developing film and then exposing and developing photographic paper.  Algorithms and silicon replace film, paper and chemical baths.

Parallels to the process of intervening in the electronics of the camera can be found in chemically processing unexposed film.  Created completely in the darkroom through the application of different chemicals directly on the film emulsion, the resulting images circumvent the need to expose film to light.  This raises the question of whether a photographic image requires the exposure of film at all, or whether its development takes precedence in the creation of photographic images.

Man Ray’s photograms alter our perception of the processes that define photography by discarding not only film, but the lens and the camera altogether.  By inserting physical objects between light and photographic paper to create images, the mechanism of the camera—the voyeur’s perspective onto the world—is circumvented.  In the digital domain, instead of adding objects to photographic paper, the addition of objects to the circuitry—alligator clips and wires—circumvents the cameras inherent image capturing capabilities.  However, because the process of modifying the cameras used in the DCP Series overrides the process of exposure, the Rayogram still falls short as a suitable analogy with which to locate the resultant digital images within the context of traditional photography.

Is it still possible to have a photograph without any of the mediums being exposed to light?

If images produced by developing unexposed, but chemically manipulated positive film or photographic paper (chemigram) can still fall under the umbrella of photography, then we have shifted the emphasis of photography from the subject, light, and exposure, to the chemical process of development which may not even involve light (except in the mediation of the electromagnetic forces responsible for chemical reactions).  To develop a single frame of unexposed (positive) film and/or an unexposed sheet of photographic paper would exemplify this process.  The question is now: where can we locate the notion of development within the practice of digital photography?

Inside the prepared digital camera, the element typically exposed to light in the production of an image, the CCD, is bypassed and the electronics responsible for interpreting its signals and writing them to a digital storage medium are manipulated to produce the image.  The process of data acquisition, processing and storage is akin to exposing film to light, and developing its negative.  When the data is read back, it is interpreted by decompression algorithms and presented on a screen.  With this software, the data set that describes the image can be manipulated using any number of mathematical operations.  This whole process of generating data and interpreting it as an image could of course be emulated within software, but the result would involve neither the mechanisms of exposure nor development in any traditional sense and thus the result could not be considered photographic.  Digital images produced within the camera occupy this interstitial zone between photography and algorithmically generated imagery, because the tools involved are designed to focus light, expose a surface and record the resulting data.  Perhaps by circumventing the process of exposure, the images produced by these prepared cameras cannot be considered photographic in any traditional sense.

DCP_0055

It is still tempting to identify the process of creating these images with photography.  The shutter release is still involved; however, the act of initiating an exposure is abstracted, initiating a Rube Goldbergesque chain of pre-programmed instructions, where photons generate electrical signals which are quantized and stored as data points.  After the intervening processes employed in the production of the DCP Series, the digital camera thinks it’s taking an exposure but the paths from the CCD to the recording device have been severely compromised.  By bypassing the CCD electronics, we intercept the digital processes of “development”—analog to digital conversion, compression algorithms, etc.— and dump our redirected electrons onto what would in film photography been the exposed and developed negative: the flash memory card.  It’s like taking a picture with the shutter mechanism disabled and afterwards bathing the film in a cocktail of different chemicals; you trigger the mechanics of an exposure but what happens in the treatment of the “film” is what we’re concerned with.  You could almost discard the camera altogether, except that in the digital camera the translation of the image from CCD to storage medium—what would otherwise be from film to developed negative and then to photograph paper etc.—is dependent upon the system of components and short-circuits that have no algorithmic equivalent, they escape the type of emulation that would allow us to forget about the physical object altogether.

No doubt, this whole process is, in the end, digital, but perhaps there is hope that it is actually a possibility to contextualize it within the domain of photography and not simply relegate it to the domain of digital image production.  It may be that by preparing poloroid cameras so that the film is physically damaged while it is being pulled through the mechanisms, we find the closest parallels to these images in the DCP Series.

As a final note, this whole exercise of attempting locating this work within the tradition of photography is necessary because it is not based in emulation.  The act of using a digital camera locates the resulting image within the practice of photography. The question then is if altering the electronics of the camera is a photographic process, does it have a precedent from previous photographic traditions and if so in which specific stage of the whole process can we find the closest similarities? Of course, I’m also interested in how this obscures the definition of photography—whether digital or film-based—and also whether there are other practices that have touched upon this problem of “what is photography?”. So that the traditionalists may understand the images and the process in terms of what they already know, we can refer back to those artists who are chemically manipulating unexposed film and developing the results. Though the analogy is not a perfect match, the form of photography discovered and exploited in the production of the DCP Series is the digital age’s answer to those artists.

See Also

Artists:
Pierre Cordier
Polli Marriner
Francoise André

Reading list:

Luis Nadeau, Encyclopedia of Printing, Photographic and Photomechanical Processes New Brunswick, NJ (Atelier Luis Nadeau), 1989, and the related website, photoconservation.com

Gordon Baldwin, Looking at Photographs: A Guide to Technical Terms Los Angeles and London (J. Paul Getty Museum in association with the British Museum Press), 1991


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