An artist working with electronics and electronic media, based in Brooklyn, NY

Festivals

3D Printed Seashells

Listening to the Ocean on a Shore of Gypsum Sand is a collaborative project between Gene Kogan, Phillip Stearns, and Dan Tesene. Seashells are 3d printed from algorithmically generated forms for the sole purpose of listening to the “ocean”. The project questions the role of experience in the mediation of the virtual world to the real world and visa versa.

For those of us who have had the experience of listening to the sound of the ocean in actual seashells, it is a questions of lived experience shaping an approach, not only to the object (or world) at hand, but how it is perceived and acted upon.  Are we to trust these shells?  Do we seek out natural shells for comparison?

To those for whom their first experience of listening to the “ocean” through the digitally produced shell, the question becomes one of how the first encounter with a virtualized and simulated reality shapes the experience of lived space.  This virtual shell is all I know of the real, until I encounter those found in nature—and when I see this natural shell, what then is my experience of?  More broadly, how does mediated reality form our preconceptions of the world?

For some, these questions seem obvious—we may even have convinced ourselves that we have this all figured out.  We are aware of the possibility that the virtual world and real world are two interacting identities, distinct ideas that maintain their individuality despite their mutual influence on one another.  There is, however, a possibility that this distinction is fading with younger generations, as technologically mediated experiences permeate childhood.  I wonder about the effect of this as they grown into the world.

This project will be on view at Soundwalk 2012, a sound art festival in Long Beach, CA on September 1st 6-10pm.


Update: Lumen 2012

 

Last weekend I participated in LUMEN 2012, a light art festival which took place this year at the Atlantic Salt Co. on Staten Island.  Yes, it is a uniquely Staten Island event and experience, and quite possibly the most diverse and simultaneously cohesive show I take part in.  The crowd ranges from Williamsburg hipsters to Staten Island families, and the art represents every discipline from action painting, performance, video, audio-visual and more abstract light based forms (projections into clouds of smoke!).

My contribution to the event was a simplified version of a project I submitted to BAM’s Public Art Project towards the end of last year.  You can find video documentation of Impact Study No. 1 here.


Soundwalk 2011 – October 1st

Coming up on Saturday October 1st in Long Beach, CA: Soundwalk 2011

“SoundWalk is an ear-oriented art event produced annually by the Long Beach artist group, FLOOD. The evening operates under the concept of a five-hour audioscopic experience as provided by sound art located in various indoor and outdoor spaces situated in Downtown Long Beach. The artwork combines, in multiple ways, a wide range of media as well as other interplayful sensory elements. There are sculptures, environments, installations, both interactive and passive, as well as scheduled performances.” —source: http://soundwalk.org/

For Any Number of Brass Instruments: 2011-2012 (For Radu Malfatti) will be included amongst the 42 different installations and artworks. Scores will be available at the information desk for the event. The composition is text-based, easy to read, and anyone can participate, even if you do not have an instrument. If you do play a brass instrument, please bring it and join in the year-long performance. You may perform this composition wherever you are and whenever you wish, so long as it’s before New Years 2012.


Proto-chiptune 100% Solar Powered @ Maker Faire

Maker Faire 2011 in NYC is chock full of some amazing projects.  The sheer quantity and variety of makers showcasing work is staggering.  To see everything is definitely more than a two day affair.  This year I was invited to present a self-built solar powered music making system for 3rd Ward, where I currently teach the art of making DIY Synthesizers and small scale solar charging systems.

This solar music making station (Protochiptune Project) is powered by a Voltaic Systems 15 Watt panel connected to a 7.5Ah 12V Seal Lead Acid Battery.  A 10A solar charge controller does all the power management to drive the music synthesizer’s three 5 Watt amplifiers.  The microchips used are from the 4000 series CMOS digital logic family, including such chips as: hex inverting buffer (40106), 12-bit binary counter (4040), 8-to-1 selector switch (4051), quad 2-input AND gate (4081), and divide by n counter (4018).  These chips are used together to produce a range of pitches and rhythms that can be sequenced or programmed by moving jumper cables on the breadboard, making a mini patchable modular synth.

At Maker Faire, kids were really attracted to the crazy jams coming out of this thing.  Those who were bold enough were allowed to move some of the jumpers around on the board and make up their own musical patterns.


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