An artist working with electronics and electronic media, based in Brooklyn, NY

Archive for January, 2012

Video

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A white vertical line on a black background scans across the screen from left to right and back again.  The resulting video is exported and re-compressed 102 times.


Image

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Still image from a video of a vertical white line sweeping across a black background, from left to right and back again, after 102 passes of heavy compression.


Image

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Source image generated using a prepared Olympus C-840L, converted from JPG to GIF, manipulated in Hex Fiend, cropped and color adjusted in GIMP.


Image

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Source image generated using a prepared Olympus C-840L, converted between JPG, GIF, TGA, SGA, PNG, PICT and JPG-2000 while iteratively manipulated in Hex Fiend, text pasted in from Rosa Menkman’s “Glitch Studies Manifesto”, cropped in GIMP.


how does one "prepare" a digital camera? i've never heard of preparation in that sense, i'm very interested.

I’m using “prepared” in the musical sense of the word, as in “prepared piano” (see: John Cage), also as a stand in for “circuit bent”.

By adding wires, and other electronic components, I am altering the normal function of these cameras much in the same way that external objects are used to alter the timbre of an acoustic instrument.

Circuit bending is a term specific to the medium of electronics where the preparation of devices entails rewiring, short circuiting, and the addition of components or circuits to alter the output.


Image

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Created using a prepared Canon Digital Rebel, manipulated in Hex Fiend, cropped in GIMP.


Image

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Created using a prepared Canon Digital Rebel, manipulated in Hex Fiend, cropped in GIMP.


Image

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Created using a prepared Canon G5.  RAW image data was processed using GIMP to enhance interpolation errors.


Image

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Created using a prepared Canon G5.  RAW image data was processed using GIMP to enhance interpolation errors.


Year of the Glitch: A 366 Day Project for 2012

yearoftheglitch.tumblr.com

“56. What makes good glitch art good is that, amidst a seemingly endless flood of images, it maintains a sense of the wilderness within the computer ” — Hugh S. Manon and Daniel Temkin, “Notes on Glitch”

Year of the Glitch is a 366 day project aimed at exploring various manifestations of glitches (intentional and unintentional) produced by electronic systems.

Each day will bring a new image, video or sound file from a range of sources: prepared digital cameras, video capture devices, electronic displays, scanners, manipulated or corrupted files, skipping CDs, disrupted digital transmissions, etc.

These images are not of broken things, but the unlocking of other worlds latent in the technologies with which we surround ourselves.


Image

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Created from a source image generated using a prepared Olympus C-840L, converted into TIFF format, processed in Hex Fiend, cropped in GIMP.


Image

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Produced using an Olympus C-840L 1.3 MP Digital Camera, a gift from notendo.

2012 Phillip Stearns


DIY Renewable Electricity: Solar and Dynamos

DIY Renewable Electricity: Solar and Dynamos
a class taught by Phillip Stearns @ 3rd Ward

Where does your electricity come from?

To contextualize the complexities of energy production we’ll look at the life cycle of the materials and energy used to harness electrical energy from our environment. We will investigate the most prevalent electricity generation methods and the industrial processes involved in mining, refining and burning the fuels used in each. We will then create our own renewable power generators as an alternative means of powering our energy-hungry electronics.

In this workshop we will focus on creating a small solar array strong enough to charge a couple of AA batteries. We will also build simple dynamo generators that convert a permanent magnet DC motor in a device that generates electricity from mechanical energy. These power sources can be used in future electronics workshops offered at 3rd Ward.

Instructor

Phillip Stearns is a practitioner of sonic and visual arts; music composer and performer; electronics sculptor and installation artist. He views technology as a site for exploring the global society-environment system and how changes in the relationship between society and environment manifest in our technology—particularly as solutions to a cascading set of problems created by contemporary culture. Through the medium of networked systems, his work explores the horizons of information, politics, noise, control, proximity, subversion, corruption, interconnectedness and interrelatedness. Central to his practice as a visual artist and a performer are the use of custom electronics, hand-craft, hardware hacking, media technologies and iterative processes marked by a judicial use of materials, restraint, simplicity, a careful balance between conceptual depth and playfulness. He has presented, performed, lectured, exhibited, led workshops and screened works at various festivals, conferences, residencies, museums and institutions around the US, Latin America and Northern Europe.

Enroll in the DIY Renewable Electricity Workshop today:

3rd Ward Basic/Custom Member Price: $80 + $50 Materials Fee
Nonmember Price: $100 + $50 Materials Fee


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